FAIR BALL FROM LLOYD LOBB

Lloyd Lobb

Umpire spent 23 years behind the Plate on Diamonds Across the Bay of Quinte

By WENDY OUELLETTE

Traditionally regarded as villains by fans, adversarial autocrats by players, and invisible men by the press, yet the umpire is baseball’s indispensable man, for the arbiter transformed baseball from a recreational activity to a competitive sport and has personified the integrity of the professional game.

Since attorney William R. Wheaton officiated the first recorded “modern” game on October 6, 1845, umpires have made important contributions to the National Pastime.

Indeed, the history of the umpire mirrors the distinctive eras and developments of the game itself.

Lloyd Lobb never showed any favouritism. His son Gerald can attest to that. With his father as the umpire, Gerald struck out every time his dad was behind the plate.

Part of the military community, the native of Biggar, Saskatchewan, recalled playing baseball while in public school barefooted as late as in November. Lloyd and his family were posted to Trenton in 1959 and he became a player/coach for the Sgt’s Mess team.  The next year, he began his distinguished umpiring career. For the next 23 years, Lloyd was heavily involved in the umpiring scene serving as its umpire in chief for many years and forming the Centennial Umpires Association.

Always willing to serve, he also became head of the Trenton Softball League and could also be found at the local arenas doing timekeeping. Lloyd retired from umpiring in 1983.

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